Skype Commands

Command Description
/add [Skype Name] Adds a contact to the chat. For instance: /add alex_cooper1 will add that member to the chat.

Some Skype names also begin with “live:” (example: live:alex_cooper1)

/alertson [text] Allows you to specify what needs to appear in a chat for you to be notified. For example, /alertson London will only alert you when the word “London” appears in the chat.
/alertsoff Disable message notifications.
/find [text] Finds specific text in a chat. For example, /find Charlie will return the first instance of the word “Charlie” in the chat.

/get admins

Details the people administrating the chat.
/get options Details active options for current chat – see /set options below for a list of the options available.
/get role Details your role in the chat.
/showmembers Displays list of members and their roles.
/get uri Creates a URL link that other people can use to join the group chat.
/golive Starts a group call with other participants of the chat.

/info

Details number of people in chat and maximum number available.

/kick [Skype Name]

Eject chat member. For instance, /kick alex_cooper1 will eject that member from the chat.
/leave Leave current group chat.
/me [text] Your name will appear followed by any text you write. For instance, /me working from home will cause the phrase “working from home” to appear next to your name in the chat. You can use this to send a message about your activities or status.
/remotelogout Stops push notifications on all other instances of Skype except the current one.
/set options [[+|-]flag] Sets options for this chat. For example: /set options -JOINING_ENABLED switches off the JOINING_ENABLED option, while /set options +HISTORY_DISCLOSED will switch on the HIS option.
  The available flags are listed below:
  HISTORY_DISCLOSED – Joiners can see the conversation that took place before they joined. The limit that they can see is either 400 messages or two weeks of time, depending on which is reached first.
  JOINING_ENABLED – New users can join the chat.

/setrole [Skype Name] SPEAKER | ADMIN

Allows you to set a role to each chat member. A description of roles is given in the table below.

/showplaces

Lists other endpoints that can receive push notifications for calls and IMs for this Skype account.

/topic [text]

Changes the chat topic.

/get allowlist

Details people with access to the chat.
/get banlist Details people banned from the chat.
/set allowlist [[+|-]mask] .. Sets the members allowed in the chat. For instance, /set allowlist +alex_cooper1 will allow that member to join the chat.
/set banlist [[+|-]mask] .. Sets which members are banned from the chat. For instance, /set banlist +alex_cooper1 will ban that member from the chat./set banlist -alex_cooper1 will allow them to rejoin it.

Define Memory Limmit WordPress

 

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To avoid ” 500 internal server error” after updating wordpress or themes, situate you have file “php.ini” in main folder, and define your memory limmit. Just copy bellow to your php.ini

define(‘WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’, ‘256M’);

Creating a viewing environment for color management

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Your work environment influences how you see color on your monitor and on printed output. For best results, control the colors and light in your work environment by doing the following:

  • View your documents in an environment that provides a consistent light level and color temperature. For example, the color characteristics of sunlight change throughout the day and alter the way colors appear on your screen, so keep shades closed or work in a windowless room. To eliminate the blue-green cast from fluorescent lighting, you can install D50 (5000° Kelvin) lighting. You can also view printed documents using a D50 lightbox.
  • View your document in a room with neutral-colored walls and ceiling. A room’s color can affect the perception of both monitor color and printed color. The best color for a viewing room is neutral gray. Also, the color of your clothing reflecting off the glass of your monitor may affect the appearance of colors on‑screen.
  • Remove colorful background patterns on your monitor desktop. Busy or bright patterns surrounding a document interfere with accurate color perception. Set your desktop to display neutral grays only.
  • View document proofs in the real-world conditions under which your audience will see the final piece. For example, you might want to see how a housewares catalog looks under the incandescent light bulbs used in homes, or view an office furniture catalog under the fluorescent lighting used in offices. However, always make final color judgements under the lighting conditions specified by the legal requirements for contract proofs in your country.

Do you need color management?

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Without a color management system, your color specifications are device-dependent. You might not need color management if your production process is tightly controlled for one medium only. For example, you or your print service provider can tailor CMYK images and specify color values for a known, specific set of printing conditions.

The value of color management increases when you have more variables in your production process. Color management is recommended if you anticipate reusing color graphics for print and online media, using various kinds of devices within a single medium (such as different printing presses), or if you manage multiple workstations.

You will benefit from a color management system if you need to accomplish any of the following:

  • Get predictable and consistent color output on multiple output devices including color separations, your desktop printer, and your monitor. Color management is especially useful for adjusting color for devices with a relatively limited gamut, such as a four-color process printing press.
  • Accurately soft-proof (preview) a color document on your monitor by making it simulate a specific output device. (Soft-proofing is subject to the limitations of monitor display, and other factors such as room lighting conditions.)
  • Accurately evaluate and consistently incorporate color graphics from many different sources if they also use color management, and even in some cases if they don’t.
  • Send color documents to different output devices and media without having to manually adjust colors in documents or original graphics. This is valuable when creating images that will eventually be used both in print and online.
  • Print color correctly to an unknown color output device; for example, you could store a document online for consistently reproducible on‑demand color printing anywhere in the world.

What is a color management system?

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Color-matching problems result from various devices and software using different color spaces. One solution is to have a system that interprets and translates color accurately between devices. A color management system (CMS) compares the color space in which a color was created to the color space in which the same color will be output, and makes the necessary adjustments to represent the color as consistently as possible among different devices.

A color management system translates colors with the help of color profiles. A profile is a mathematical description of a device’s color space. For example, a scanner profile tells a color management system how your scanner “sees” colors. Adobe color management uses ICC profiles, a format defined by the International Color Consortium (ICC) as a cross-platform standard.

Because no single color-translation method is ideal for all types of graphics, a color management system provides a choice of rendering intents, or translation methods, so that you can apply a method appropriate to a particular graphics element. For example, a color translation method that preserves correct relationships among colors in a wildlife photograph may alter the colors in a logo containing flat tints of color.

Note: Don’t confuse color management with color correction. A color management system won’t correct an image that was saved with tonal or color balance problems. It provides an environment where you can evaluate images reliably in the context of your final output.

Why colors sometimes don’t match?

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No device in a publishing system is capable of reproducing the full range of colors viewable to the human eye. Each device operates within a specific color space that can produce a certain range, or gamut, of colors.

A color model determines the relationship between values, and the color space defines the absolute meaning of those values as colors. Some color models (such as CIE L*a*b) have a fixed color space because they relate directly to the way humans perceive color. These models are described as being device-independent. Other color models (RGB, HSL, HSB, CMYK, and so forth) can have many different color spaces. Because these models vary with each associated color space or device, they are described as being device-dependent.

Because of these varying color spaces, colors can shift in appearance as you transfer documents between different devices. Color variations can result from differences in image sources; the way software applications define color; print media (newsprint paper reproduces a smaller gamut than magazine-quality paper); and other natural variations, such as manufacturing differences in monitors or monitor age.

Color gamuts of various devices and documents
A. Lab color space
B. Documents (working space)
C. Devices

Understanding FOGRA39

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Fig03-AdobeRGBDisplayP3sRGBFOGRA39-split

FOGRA in 2006 and registered in the ICC Characterization Data Registry. It represents the colours of a typical print made by commercial offset litho on gloss or matte coated paper, according to the standard printing definition in ISO 12647-2:2004 / Amd 1.

Like all registered data sets, it represents CMYK values and the expected measurements in CIE XYZ and CIELAB. Spectral data is not available.

As with many more recent data sets, FOGRA39 is not derived from direct measurements of prints but on the results of smoothing of multiple measurements to ensure a better reproduction target.

Full details of the FOGRA39 data set can be found in the information page on FOGRA39in the Characterization Data Registry, with contact information in case of queries.

ICC profiles have been made from FOGRA39 data, including ISOcoated_v2_300_eci.icc from ECI. Profiles made from FOGRA39 data can also be found in the ICC Profile Registry.

An ICC profile made using FOGRA39 characterization data would be used to define the colours of a piece to be printed according to the corresponding printing condition. A document in RGB might be converted to CMYK using the profile as destination; or the profile might be set as the OutputIntent of a PDF/X file sent to the printer. The profile might also be used in proofing, to define the colours of the proof when reproduced on a soft proofing display or hard copy proofing system.

The Characterization Data Registry contains many other characterization data sets, each one corresponding to a specific standard printing condition. Data sets are provided by industry associations and based on experience of printing inks, papers and presses in their market; FOGRA39 is widely used in Europe but in North America CGATS21-2-CRPC6 might be more common.

For any given characterization data set it is possible to make multiple profiles, as there are different ways of constructing a profile for example to give different black generation options.

More recently Fogra have developed the FOGRA51 and FOGRA52 data sets, for premium coated and uncoated woodfree substrates respectively. These can be considered as replacements for older data sets such as FOGRA39. They are based on ISO 13655:2009 M1 measurement conditions, and include information about the amount of optical brighteners in the substrate. The FOGRA51 data set is available in both colorimetric and spectral versions. More information about FOGRA51 and FOGRA52 can be found here.

New Home

We re just newly transferred to the new home ronywibowo.work from our old sikorulab.com
There is still a lot things to be transferred here in our new home. 🙂